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Quick note on blog etiquette

I look forward to your comments and I love talking with readers, but …

My comment box is not your free advertising space.

You may be new to commenting on blogs, or you may be an aggressive marketer — but the following actions look like spam to me:

  • Repeating your website address inside a comment instead of in the website address box
  • Posting a comment that has nothing to do with the post, like "Nice post! Thanks!"
  • Using an email address that does not match your name

I don't mean to be rude, but if your comment looks spammy, I'll delete it or edit out the selfish bits. If you do it a lot, I'll report you as a spammer (which means your IP address will be blocked from most blogs).

Most bloggers would do the same thing.

Email to a friend:

Privacy: We won't save or reuse these emails.

Comments

  1. David Howse April 4, 2009 at 4:00 pm #

    Andy,
    Marketing 2.0 on Facebook has over 12,000 members – spamming has taken the fun out of running the group, I must have banned about 100 people by now.
    What I find ironic is that someone could be so stupid to spam a marketing blog – first, it probably won’t get through and second, marketers are the worst market for almost everything.
    Maybe we should start a blog about all of the idiot spammer-marketers out there :-)

  2. Kare Anderson April 4, 2009 at 5:47 pm #

    You must have had a dozy of a “comment” Andy to inspire this stern reminder (I agree with every word).
    What if you kept the “best” worst comments (contributor’s name deleted to save them from embarrassment?) + launched a contest – asking others to forward theirs, post the “real lie examples” plus, by headline, in a poll format so that we can vote on our favorite “worst” examples?
    Of course you could also have a contest for best name of this “worst” contest.

  3. kare Anderson April 4, 2009 at 5:49 pm #

    Apologies re typo in prior comment (must be a mental slip).. ahem…. I meant “real life examples.”

  4. Gino Cosme April 5, 2009 at 4:04 am #

    Nice post, thanks! *joking*
    Seriously, you’re quite right; more now than ever people are using blog comments as a way of generating links for their own sites. While all good, the least they could do is add to the conversation and provide context.
    This world would be a great place if we had just a little less spam to deal with…

  5. Mark Bradford April 6, 2009 at 7:50 pm #

    New media etiquette is fuzzy sometimes, especially for new participants. But there are some bright lines which we all ought to continue illuminating for those non-predatory marketers. Thanks again Andy. Good material for sharing with clients.

  6. Yan Budman April 9, 2009 at 3:53 am #

    Gino – exactly. What many companies fail to realize is how to use conversation marketing as a way to participate in the market conversation.
    Businesses should not blast out their marketing messages into these conversations and engage in one-directional communication. They need to contribute in a way that enhances the conversation, motivates people to participate in the conversation, and adds value.
    They should listen to what is being said. Share their views and opinions. Build relationships.
    = Participate in the “dialogue”

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